Stockton Centre furniture and fittings auction raises more than $50,000 as buildings emptied | Newcastle Herald

News, Local News, Stockton Center, Kanangra, Tomaree Lodge, Disability, Ray Norman, Crakanthorp, Real Estate

A CENTURY of history at the Stockton Center came to an end when, in the words of Newcastle MP Tim Crakanthorp, “anything that was not nailed down” was stripped of the buildings. With Stockton and Kanangra in Morisset both empty and only five people left at Tomaree Lodge, the era of large residential centers for people with disabilities in the Hunter is practically over. Hundreds of residents of the three centers now live in group houses run by non-governmental charitable groups. There are still concerns about the new system of “assistance” rather than “care-based care”, but the New South Wales government insists that bringing residents “into the community” is an undeniable achievement. Confirmation of the emptied buildings appeared on the website of Newcastle auctioneer Ray Norman, who was commissioned to sell whatever was left after the government took what it wanted. Normans Auctions held two online Hospital Site Clearance auctions: one of 719 lots and the other of 246 lots. Both closed on Monday November 30th. The winning bids could still be seen yesterday afternoon, indicating that the auctions raised more than $ 50,000. Mr Norman said yesterday that he originally went to Stockton to evaluate artwork from the various buildings. “I had the leftovers, but we sold 97 percent of the tickets. I think that was a good result,” said Norman. A spokesman for the Department for Communities and Justice said the “vast majority of equipment” from Stockton went to Corrective Services Industries. Families of some former residents asked why furniture didn’t go with residents to their group homes, but the spokesman said equipment had been offered to a number of non-governmental organizations but the offers were turned down. The spokesman said Morisset’s surplus equipment is part of the same “asset disposal process”. When asked about the future of the three locations, the spokesman said no decision had been made on Stockton. READ MORE: You Said Morisset is owned by the Department of Health. Regarding Tomaree, the spokesman said the government had “previously promised that the site will be available for public use in the future,” but that no planning for its future will be made until the last five residents have moved into the group house to be built be for you. Newcastle Labor MP Tim Crakanthorp said he was increasingly concerned about the government’s plans for the Stockton site. It “completely ignored” its “very specific” parliamentary questions on the subject. “They also conveniently ignored that a process was in progress to sell anything that wasn’t pinned down,” said Crakanthorp. “The closings of the three centers were secret from the start and obviously nothing has changed.” For faster access to the latest Newcastle news, download our NEWCASTLE HERALD app and sign up for the latest news, sports and news directly to your email address.

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December 10, 2020 – 7:00 a.m.

ALL GONE: After seven years of protest and opposition to the closings of the Stockton Center, Kanangra in Morisset and Tomaree Lodge in Port Stephens, the fight is over.  Stockton and Morisset have been stripped of furniture and fixtures and there are only five people left in Tomaree.

ALL GONE: After seven years of protest and opposition to the closings of the Stockton Center, Kanangra in Morisset and Tomaree Lodge in Port Stephens, the fight is over. Stockton and Morisset have been stripped of furniture and fixtures and there are only five people left in Tomaree.

A CENTURY of history at the Stockton Center came to an end when, in the words of Newcastle MP Tim Crakanthorp, “anything that was not nailed down” was stripped of the buildings.

With Stockton and Kanangra in Morisset both empty and only five people left at Tomaree Lodge, the era of large residential centers for people with disabilities in the Hunter is practically over.

Hundreds of residents of the three centers now live in group houses run by non-governmental charitable groups. There are still concerns about the new system of “assistance” rather than “care-based care”, but the New South Wales government insists that bringing residents “into the community” is an undeniable achievement.

Confirmation of the emptied buildings appeared on the website of Newcastle auctioneer Ray Norman, who was commissioned to sell whatever was left after the government took what it wanted.

Normans Auctions held two online Hospital Site Clearance auctions: one of 719 lots and the other of 246 lots. Both closed on Monday November 30th.

The winning bids could still be seen yesterday afternoon, indicating that the auctions raised more than $ 50,000.

Mr Norman said yesterday that he originally went to Stockton to evaluate artwork from the various buildings.

“I had the leftovers, but we sold 97 percent of the tickets. I think that was a good result,” said Norman.

A spokesman for the Department for Communities and Justice said the “vast majority of equipment” from Stockton went to Corrective Services Industries.

Families of some former residents asked why furniture didn’t go with residents to their group homes, but the spokesman said equipment had been offered to a number of non-governmental organizations but the offers were turned down. The spokesman said Morisset’s surplus equipment is part of the same “asset disposal process”.

When asked about the future of the three locations, the spokesman said no decision had been made on Stockton.

They said Morisset is owned by the Ministry of Health.

Regarding Tomaree, the spokesman said the government had “previously promised that the site will be available for public use in the future,” but that no planning for its future will be made until the last five residents have moved into the group house to be built be for you.

Newcastle Labor MP Tim Crakanthorp said he was increasingly concerned about the government’s plans for the Stockton site. It “completely ignored” its “very specific” parliamentary questions on the subject.

“They also conveniently ignored that a process was in progress to sell anything that wasn’t pinned down,” said Crakanthorp.

“The closings of the three centers were secret from the start and obviously nothing has changed.”

SOLD: One of the 956 lots Newcastle auctioneer Ray Norman has auctioned online.

SOLD: One of the 956 lots Newcastle auctioneer Ray Norman has auctioned online.

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